Interesting Esoterica

Designing tie knots by random walks

Article by Thomas M. Fink and Yong Mao
  • Published in 1999
  • Added on
In the collection
The simplest of conventional tie knots, the four-in-hand, has its origins in late-nineteenth-century England. The Duke of Windsor, as King Edward VIII became after abdicating in 1936, is credited with introducing what is now known as the Windsor knot, from which its smaller derivative, the half-Windsor, evolved. In 1989, the Pratt knot, the first new knot to appear in fifty years, was revealed on the front page of The New York Times.

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BibTeX entry

@article{Fink1999,
	title = {Designing tie knots by random walks},
	author = {Thomas M. Fink and Yong Mao},
	url = {http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v398/n6722/abs/398031a0.html},
	urldate = {2011-12-09},
	abstract = {The simplest of conventional tie knots, the four-in-hand, has its origins in late-nineteenth-century England. The Duke of Windsor, as King Edward VIII became after abdicating in 1936, is credited with introducing what is now known as the Windsor knot, from which its smaller derivative, the half-Windsor, evolved. In 1989, the Pratt knot, the first new knot to appear in fifty years, was revealed on the front page of The New York Times.},
	comment = {},
	collections = {Probability and statistics},
	year = 1999
}